Which has more mass?

  1. Choice:

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  • Avatar of Hirsute Hirsute Mar 12, 2009 at 02:40 UTC - 0 likes

    Aye, I'm going to have abstain. Mass is mass is mass. Slight correction to another comment: technically, nothing "weighs" 1 kg. Weight in SI would be measured in Newtons, as weight takes units of force, not units of mass. The equivalent unit in the American system to the kilgram would be the slug.

    /geek

  • Avatar of mikk mikk Mar 12, 2009 at 01:34 UTC - 0 likes

    Unless the 1kg bag of lead has ridiculous amounts of free space in it, I'd have to go with the 1 kg (weighed) bag of feathers. The weight of the air won't show up when weighed, but it's certainly mass.

  • Avatar of balding_ape balding_ape Mar 11, 2009 at 21:33 UTC - 0 likes

    "If someone wanted to trick another, one could ask something like: Which is heavier? 1 pound of gold or 1 pound of feathers. In this case it would be feathers. However, that is because gold uses troy pounds and feathers uses avoirdupois pounds, and an avoirdupois pound weighs more than a troy pound. But in our question we are using lead, and lead uses the avoirdupois pounds."

    Those sorts of questions are sophistry. Who compares pound measurements for things using different scales for a pound? The only way that answer isn't a "cheap trick" is if the question somehow suggests the comparison has to do with the value of the gold (or feathers).

    Nice explanation of the mass-weight-displacement question. I wonder how densely packed the feathers would have to be in the bag before they became equal in mass to the lead?

  • Avatar of Nimhfree Nimhfree Mar 11, 2009 at 16:51 UTC - 0 likes

    Such a simple question. However, it is an interesting one to explain.

    If someone wanted to trick another, one could ask something like: Which is heavier? 1 pound of gold or 1 pound of feathers. In this case it would be feathers. However, that is because gold uses troy pounds and feathers uses avoirdupois pounds, and an avoirdupois pound weighs more than a troy pound. But in our question we are using lead, and lead uses the avoirdupois pounds.

    Also note we are not asking which weighs more, but which has more mass. If we are to assume the 1kg that each possesses is the mass of the objects and not their weight, we can note that most likely the lead WEIGHS more because the feathers displace more air (assuming feathers are found as we expect them). Note in this case the two have the same mass and we do not care about their WEIGHT.

    If we assume the 1kg is their WEIGHT and not their mass, we can assume the feathers has more MASS (because it displaces more air).

    Since we have no option for both having the same mass, one assumes the answers show their weight and it is feathers that has more mass.

  • Avatar of boneschaman boneschaman Mar 11, 2009 at 11:25 UTC - 0 likes

    bag of feathers!!!

  • Avatar of Emoir Emoir Mar 10, 2009 at 15:12 UTC - 0 likes

    What an evil vote. I must abstain seeing how there is no correct answer presented.

  • Avatar of balding_ape balding_ape Mar 10, 2009 at 13:51 UTC - 0 likes

    Unless you know of some other planet that contains bags and feathers, we're talking Earth. ;)

    Are you suggesting that different gravities will affect the two substances proportionally differently? They might not weigh 1kg, but they would still weigh the same, no?

  • Avatar of Pericles Pericles Mar 09, 2009 at 17:40 UTC - 0 likes

    Since mass as opposed to weight is measured in Kg, 1Kg of one item = 1Kg of another. Thus poll is missing third option neither they are the same.

    Had the question been which has more weight we might have answered differently but then would needed to have known which planet we were talking about taking the measurement on etc etc.

  • Avatar of break19 break19 Mar 09, 2009 at 12:24 UTC - 0 likes

    1kg 'bag of whatever' vs 1kg 'bag of something else'

    is 1kg vs 1kg.

    The 'bag of x' is simply describing the contents, but in no way affects the mass.

    It does, however, affect the volume.. eg: how much space it takes up.

    And -everyone- knows mass != volume.


  • Avatar of F636y623 F636y623 Mar 09, 2009 at 11:17 UTC - 0 likes

    Oh my.... I'd say: "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." :P

Facts

Posted on
Mar 06, 2009
Last updated
Mar 06, 2009
Voted on
305 times